[etoys-dev] [GSoC ideas] Squeak

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[etoys-dev] [GSoC ideas] Squeak

Bert Freudenberg
(sending on behalf of Paolo Bonzini, who runs this year's Smalltalk GSoC)

Hi folks,

ESUG, the European Smalltalk User Group, is applying for this year's Google Summer of Code.  As you probably know, the Summer of Code provides the opportunity to fund students to work during the summer on Smalltalk.  Please reply to this email (be sure to use "Reply to all") if you have ideas you would like to propose.

Please include a summary of the project and links to web pages that can help prospective students to write their application. Please also include the following information:

- if applicable, other dialects that you would be willing to mentor this project for

- the skill level

- name of the mentor(s), email addresses, and possibly any IRC network/channel/nickname where they can be found.

Thanks for contributing to ESUG's Summer of Code application!

- Bert -



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Re: [etoys-dev] [gsoc-mentors] [GSoC ideas] Squeak

Ricardo Moran
Hi,
I would like to propose the following projects:

==========================================================================
Project name: Implementing Etoys on Amber

Description:
The objective of this project is the implementation of a subset of Etoys features on top of Amber Smalltalk. This subset should at least include a basic version of the halos, viewer, and script editor. 
To develop the graphical user interface, several libraries can be used, for example: Morphic on Athens [1], morphic.js [2], KinecticJS [3], etc. The student would need to decide which of these is more suitable for the task.
This project would have an enormous impact on Etoys users by allowing them to work and share their projects directly in the browser without installing any plugin.

Skill level: Intermediate

Possible mentors: 
- Ricardo Moran ([hidden email])
- Gonzalo Zabala ([hidden email])
==========================================================================
Project name: Etoys touch UI

Description: 
The objective of this project is to adapt the Etoys user interface for touch gestures such as rotate, scale, and such. Currently, Etoys is very dependent on the user to interact with Morphs with the cursor. Given the popularity of multitouch devices this represents a severe disadvantage.
Bert Freudenberg has done some initial work adapting the Squeak Virtual Machine and Morphic to support multitouch events [1]. As he stated, the UI would need to be improved (or maybe even redesigned from scratch) before we can deliver this to kids.
In this project we don't propose the complete redesign of Etoys UI (which we think it would take more than 3 months to complete) but at least a new implementation of Morphic interaction that takes into account multitouch gestures.

Skill level: Intermediate
Possible mentors: 
- Gonzalo Zabala ([hidden email])
- Matías Teragni ([hidden email])
==========================================================================
Project name: Physical Etoys plugins

Description:
Currectly, Physical Etoys is dependent on a number of external libraries to interact with different hardware platforms. To do this, Physical Etoys uses FFI bindings, which represents a security issue. To solve it we propose the implementation of this FFI bindings as VM plugins.
The student would need to learn how to compile Etoys VM and Slang in order to implement the plugins.

Skill level: Intermediate
Possible mentors: 
- Matías Teragni ([hidden email])
- Gabriela Arévalo ([hidden email])
==========================================================================
Project name: Physical Etoys XO bundle

Description:
The objective of this project is to finish the bundling of Physical Etoys as a Sugar activity for the XO computers. The student will need to make sure all Physical Etoys modules work correctly in Linux and specifically on the XO laptop. This would involve porting some libraries, dealing with platform-specific issues and wrap all the necessary files in an Activity bundle.

Skill level: Intermediate
Possible mentors: 
- Gabriela Arévalo ([hidden email])
- Ricardo Moran ([hidden email])
==========================================================================

Best regards,
Richo


On Tue, Feb 11, 2014 at 2:03 PM, Bert Freudenberg <[hidden email]> wrote:
(sending on behalf of Paolo Bonzini, who runs this year's Smalltalk GSoC)

Hi folks,

ESUG, the European Smalltalk User Group, is applying for this year's Google Summer of Code.  As you probably know, the Summer of Code provides the opportunity to fund students to work during the summer on Smalltalk.  Please reply to this email (be sure to use "Reply to all") if you have ideas you would like to propose.

Please include a summary of the project and links to web pages that can help prospective students to write their application. Please also include the following information:

- if applicable, other dialects that you would be willing to mentor this project for

- the skill level

- name of the mentor(s), email addresses, and possibly any IRC network/channel/nickname where they can be found.

Thanks for contributing to ESUG's Summer of Code application!

- Bert -




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Re: [etoys-dev] [gsoc-mentors] [GSoC ideas] Squeak

Bert Freudenberg
Awesome projects! Thank you :)

- Bert -

On 14.02.2014, at 12:58, Ricardo Moran <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi,
I would like to propose the following projects:

==========================================================================
Project name: Implementing Etoys on Amber

Description:
The objective of this project is the implementation of a subset of Etoys features on top of Amber Smalltalk. This subset should at least include a basic version of the halos, viewer, and script editor. 
To develop the graphical user interface, several libraries can be used, for example: Morphic on Athens [1], morphic.js [2], KinecticJS [3], etc. The student would need to decide which of these is more suitable for the task.
This project would have an enormous impact on Etoys users by allowing them to work and share their projects directly in the browser without installing any plugin.

Skill level: Intermediate

Possible mentors: 
- Ricardo Moran ([hidden email])
- Gonzalo Zabala ([hidden email])
==========================================================================
Project name: Etoys touch UI

Description: 
The objective of this project is to adapt the Etoys user interface for touch gestures such as rotate, scale, and such. Currently, Etoys is very dependent on the user to interact with Morphs with the cursor. Given the popularity of multitouch devices this represents a severe disadvantage.
Bert Freudenberg has done some initial work adapting the Squeak Virtual Machine and Morphic to support multitouch events [1]. As he stated, the UI would need to be improved (or maybe even redesigned from scratch) before we can deliver this to kids.
In this project we don't propose the complete redesign of Etoys UI (which we think it would take more than 3 months to complete) but at least a new implementation of Morphic interaction that takes into account multitouch gestures.

Skill level: Intermediate
Possible mentors: 
- Gonzalo Zabala ([hidden email])
- Matías Teragni ([hidden email])
==========================================================================
Project name: Physical Etoys plugins

Description:
Currectly, Physical Etoys is dependent on a number of external libraries to interact with different hardware platforms. To do this, Physical Etoys uses FFI bindings, which represents a security issue. To solve it we propose the implementation of this FFI bindings as VM plugins.
The student would need to learn how to compile Etoys VM and Slang in order to implement the plugins.

Skill level: Intermediate
Possible mentors: 
- Matías Teragni ([hidden email])
- Gabriela Arévalo ([hidden email])
==========================================================================
Project name: Physical Etoys XO bundle

Description:
The objective of this project is to finish the bundling of Physical Etoys as a Sugar activity for the XO computers. The student will need to make sure all Physical Etoys modules work correctly in Linux and specifically on the XO laptop. This would involve porting some libraries, dealing with platform-specific issues and wrap all the necessary files in an Activity bundle.

Skill level: Intermediate
Possible mentors: 
- Gabriela Arévalo ([hidden email])
- Ricardo Moran ([hidden email])
==========================================================================

Best regards,
Richo


On Tue, Feb 11, 2014 at 2:03 PM, Bert Freudenberg <[hidden email]> wrote:
(sending on behalf of Paolo Bonzini, who runs this year's Smalltalk GSoC)

Hi folks,

ESUG, the European Smalltalk User Group, is applying for this year's Google Summer of Code.  As you probably know, the Summer of Code provides the opportunity to fund students to work during the summer on Smalltalk.  Please reply to this email (be sure to use "Reply to all") if you have ideas you would like to propose.

Please include a summary of the project and links to web pages that can help prospective students to write their application. Please also include the following information:

- if applicable, other dialects that you would be willing to mentor this project for

- the skill level

- name of the mentor(s), email addresses, and possibly any IRC network/channel/nickname where they can be found.

Thanks for contributing to ESUG's Summer of Code application!

- Bert -




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Re: [etoys-dev] [gsoc-mentors] [GSoC ideas] Squeak/Etoys

Bert Freudenberg
In reply to this post by Bert Freudenberg
1. Make Etoys work on SqueakJS

Increasingly, there are systems that do not support web browser plugins, or that even disallow installing certain software without "jailbreaking". Even if the system would support it, some administrators disallow installing of custom plugins. This presents a problem for Squeak/Etoys [1] which is used in schools world-wide, but cannot be installed on more and more systems. The single commonly supported runtime system is HTML5 + Javascript. SqueakJS [2] is a Squeak VM running on top of Javascript, on various platforms.

In this project, a student would extend SqueakJS to be able to run an Etoys image. It should provide an experience similar to running the Squeak Plugin VM in a web browser: load a project from a URL and allow uploading modified projects. The initial version does not need to be very performant, speed optimizations can be done when we have a working system.

Level: advanced
Skills required: JavaScript, Smalltalk

Mentor: Bert Freudenberg <[hidden email]>

[1] http://squeakland.org/
[2] http://bertfreudenberg.github.io/SqueakJS/

===================================================================

2. Port Squeak/Etoys to Chrome OS

Many schools are buying Chromebooks [1] because they are cheap and easy to maintain. Squeakland [2] has gotten multiple requests to make Etoys work on these machines. The best way to do this is running a Squeak VM via Native Client [3].

Yoshiki Ohshima started such a VM port [4] demonstrating the feasibility. His sources are available on github. They need to be updated to work with a current NaCl SDK, and a portable VM must be built (PNaCl). It needs to be tested on actual Chrome book hardware as well as a Chrome browser on PCs. Support for downloading and uploading projects must be implemented so it can be used as a direct replacement for the Squeak browser plugin.

Level: medium
Skills required: C, Smalltalk

Mentors:
Yoshiki Ohshima <[hidden email]>
Bert Freudenberg <[hidden email]>

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromebook
[2] http://squeakland.org/
[3] https://developers.google.com/native-client
[4] http://lists.squeak.org/pipermail/vm-dev/2011-May/007991.html

- Bert -



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Re: [etoys-dev] [gsoc-mentors] [GSoC ideas] Squeak/Etoys

Yoshiki Ohshima-3
Thank you, Bert!

On Sun, Feb 16, 2014 at 8:07 AM, Bert Freudenberg <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Mentors:
> Yoshiki Ohshima <[hidden email]>

I would highly prefer to use [hidden email] instead of the
gmail address as the contact address.

--
-- Yoshiki
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Re: [etoys-dev] [gsoc-mentors] [GSoC ideas] Squeak/Etoys

Steve Thomas
In reply to this post by Bert Freudenberg
Many children can not communicate verbally whether due to nonverbal autism or some other factor.  There is a OLPC deployment in Uraguay where a student uses his stuffed animal as an input device for using an XO and Etoys.  We would like to build on this to make it easier and cheaper for these children and their parents to communicate and use computers.

In the first project a student would design and document how to hack a stuffed animal to be used as an input device similar to a joystick or arrow and a few other keys to allow a nonverbal child to use their favorite stuffed animal as an input device.

Level: beginner
Skills required: Maker skills. To Hack a stuffed animal. Etoys (If student knows Scratch, they can learn the skills needed in Etoys for this project)

In the second project a student would design a set of picture boards that could be navigated using a joystick or arrow keys and arrow and few other keys.  The project would also allow a parent or teacher to simply add and re-arrange pictures using a webcam, imported pictures or simple drawings that can be made using Etoys[1].  Etoys runs on Linux, Windows and Mac OS and is one of the core applications in the OLPC XO.

Level: beginner
Skills required: Etoys (If student knows Scratch, they can learn the skills needed in Etoys for this project)

Mentor:
Stephen Thomas <[hidden email]>

[1] http://squeakland.org/


On Sun, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:07 AM, Bert Freudenberg <[hidden email]> wrote:
1. Make Etoys work on SqueakJS

Increasingly, there are systems that do not support web browser plugins, or that even disallow installing certain software without "jailbreaking". Even if the system would support it, some administrators disallow installing of custom plugins. This presents a problem for Squeak/Etoys [1] which is used in schools world-wide, but cannot be installed on more and more systems. The single commonly supported runtime system is HTML5 + Javascript. SqueakJS [2] is a Squeak VM running on top of Javascript, on various platforms.

In this project, a student would extend SqueakJS to be able to run an Etoys image. It should provide an experience similar to running the Squeak Plugin VM in a web browser: load a project from a URL and allow uploading modified projects. The initial version does not need to be very performant, speed optimizations can be done when we have a working system.

Level: advanced
Skills required: JavaScript, Smalltalk

Mentor: Bert Freudenberg <[hidden email]>

[1] http://squeakland.org/
[2] http://bertfreudenberg.github.io/SqueakJS/

===================================================================

2. Port Squeak/Etoys to Chrome OS

Many schools are buying Chromebooks [1] because they are cheap and easy to maintain. Squeakland [2] has gotten multiple requests to make Etoys work on these machines. The best way to do this is running a Squeak VM via Native Client [3].

Yoshiki Ohshima started such a VM port [4] demonstrating the feasibility. His sources are available on github. They need to be updated to work with a current NaCl SDK, and a portable VM must be built (PNaCl). It needs to be tested on actual Chrome book hardware as well as a Chrome browser on PCs. Support for downloading and uploading projects must be implemented so it can be used as a direct replacement for the Squeak browser plugin.

Level: medium
Skills required: C, Smalltalk

Mentors:
Yoshiki Ohshima <[hidden email]>
Bert Freudenberg <[hidden email]>

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromebook
[2] http://squeakland.org/
[3] https://developers.google.com/native-client
[4] http://lists.squeak.org/pipermail/vm-dev/2011-May/007991.html

- Bert -



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--

To some of us, writing computer programs is a fascinating game. A program is a building of thought. It is costless to build, weightless, growing easily under our typing hands. If we get carried away, its size and complexity will grow out of control, confusing even the one who created it. This is the main problem of programming. It is why so much of today's software tends to crash, fail, screw up.

When a program works, it is beautiful. The art of programming is the skill of controlling complexity. The great program is subdued, made simple in its complexity.

- Martin Harverbeke (from Eloquent JavaScript)


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Re: [etoys-dev] [gsoc-mentors] [GSoC ideas] Squeak/Etoys

Harness, Kathleen
Steve,
You may want to emphasize in the application that this is a low cost adaptive technology. There are many catalogs and websites with adaptive equipment and software but the prices are high. A cost comparison might be persuasive.
Regards,
Kathleen

From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] on behalf of Steve Thomas [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, February 17, 2014 12:19 AM
To: Bert Freudenberg
Cc: [hidden email]; etoys dev; Paolo Bonzini; The general-purpose Squeak developers list
Subject: Re: [etoys-dev] [gsoc-mentors] [GSoC ideas] Squeak/Etoys

Many children can not communicate verbally whether due to nonverbal autism or some other factor.  There is a OLPC deployment in Uraguay where a student uses his stuffed animal as an input device for using an XO and Etoys.  We would like to build on this to make it easier and cheaper for these children and their parents to communicate and use computers.

In the first project a student would design and document how to hack a stuffed animal to be used as an input device similar to a joystick or arrow and a few other keys to allow a nonverbal child to use their favorite stuffed animal as an input device.

Level: beginner
Skills required: Maker skills. To Hack a stuffed animal. Etoys (If student knows Scratch, they can learn the skills needed in Etoys for this project)

In the second project a student would design a set of picture boards that could be navigated using a joystick or arrow keys and arrow and few other keys.  The project would also allow a parent or teacher to simply add and re-arrange pictures using a webcam, imported pictures or simple drawings that can be made using Etoys[1].  Etoys runs on Linux, Windows and Mac OS and is one of the core applications in the OLPC XO.

Level: beginner
Skills required: Etoys (If student knows Scratch, they can learn the skills needed in Etoys for this project)

Mentor:
Stephen Thomas <[hidden email]>

[1] http://squeakland.org/


On Sun, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:07 AM, Bert Freudenberg <[hidden email]> wrote:
1. Make Etoys work on SqueakJS

Increasingly, there are systems that do not support web browser plugins, or that even disallow installing certain software without "jailbreaking". Even if the system would support it, some administrators disallow installing of custom plugins. This presents a problem for Squeak/Etoys [1] which is used in schools world-wide, but cannot be installed on more and more systems. The single commonly supported runtime system is HTML5 + Javascript. SqueakJS [2] is a Squeak VM running on top of Javascript, on various platforms.

In this project, a student would extend SqueakJS to be able to run an Etoys image. It should provide an experience similar to running the Squeak Plugin VM in a web browser: load a project from a URL and allow uploading modified projects. The initial version does not need to be very performant, speed optimizations can be done when we have a working system.

Level: advanced
Skills required: JavaScript, Smalltalk

Mentor: Bert Freudenberg <[hidden email]>

[1] http://squeakland.org/
[2] http://bertfreudenberg.github.io/SqueakJS/

===================================================================

2. Port Squeak/Etoys to Chrome OS

Many schools are buying Chromebooks [1] because they are cheap and easy to maintain. Squeakland [2] has gotten multiple requests to make Etoys work on these machines. The best way to do this is running a Squeak VM via Native Client [3].

Yoshiki Ohshima started such a VM port [4] demonstrating the feasibility. His sources are available on github. They need to be updated to work with a current NaCl SDK, and a portable VM must be built (PNaCl). It needs to be tested on actual Chrome book hardware as well as a Chrome browser on PCs. Support for downloading and uploading projects must be implemented so it can be used as a direct replacement for the Squeak browser plugin.

Level: medium
Skills required: C, Smalltalk

Mentors:
Yoshiki Ohshima <[hidden email]>
Bert Freudenberg <[hidden email]>

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromebook
[2] http://squeakland.org/
[3] https://developers.google.com/native-client
[4] http://lists.squeak.org/pipermail/vm-dev/2011-May/007991.html

- Bert -



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--

To some of us, writing computer programs is a fascinating game. A program is a building of thought. It is costless to build, weightless, growing easily under our typing hands. If we get carried away, its size and complexity will grow out of control, confusing even the one who created it. This is the main problem of programming. It is why so much of today's software tends to crash, fail, screw up.

When a program works, it is beautiful. The art of programming is the skill of controlling complexity. The great program is subdued, made simple in its complexity.

- Martin Harverbeke (from Eloquent JavaScript)


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Re: [etoys-dev] [gsoc-mentors] [GSoC ideas] Squeak/Etoys

Steve Thomas
Kathleen,

Great feedback, thanks.  Below is an updated version:

Many children can not communicate verbally whether due to nonverbal autism or some other factor.  While there are many catalogs and websites with adaptive equipment and software but the prices are high.  There is a OLPC deployment in Uraguay where a student uses his stuffed animal as an input device for using an XO and Etoys.  We would like to build on this to make it easier and lower cost or these children and their parents to communicate and use computers.  The software would be free and OpenSource and the hardware to hack a Stuffed Animal could potentially repurpose old keyboards [2] or under $10 by repurposing a used USB game controller (free if kids donate their old ones). 

In the first project a student would design and document how to hack a stuffed animal to be used as an input device similar to a joystick or arrow and a few other keys to allow a nonverbal child to use their favorite stuffed animal as an input device.

Level: beginner
Skills required: Maker skills. To Hack a stuffed animal. Etoys (If student knows Scratch, they can learn the skills needed in Etoys for this project)

In the second project a student would design a set of picture boards that could be navigated using a joystick or arrow keys and arrow and few other keys.  The project would also allow a parent or teacher to simply add and re-arrange pictures using a webcam, imported pictures or simple drawings that can be made using Etoys[1].  Etoys runs on Linux, Windows and Mac OS and is one of the core applications in the OLPC XO.

Level: beginner
Skills required: Etoys (If student knows Scratch, they can learn the skills needed in Etoys for this project)

Mentor:
Stephen Thomas <[hidden email]>
 
On Mon, Feb 17, 2014 at 11:23 AM, Harness, Kathleen <[hidden email]> wrote:
Steve,
You may want to emphasize in the application that this is a low cost adaptive technology. There are many catalogs and websites with adaptive equipment and software but the prices are high. A cost comparison might be persuasive.
Regards,
Kathleen

From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]] on behalf of Steve Thomas [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, February 17, 2014 12:19 AM
To: Bert Freudenberg
Cc: [hidden email]; etoys dev; Paolo Bonzini; The general-purpose Squeak developers list

Subject: Re: [etoys-dev] [gsoc-mentors] [GSoC ideas] Squeak/Etoys

Many children can not communicate verbally whether due to nonverbal autism or some other factor.  There is a OLPC deployment in Uraguay where a student uses his stuffed animal as an input device for using an XO and Etoys.  We would like to build on this to make it easier and cheaper for these children and their parents to communicate and use computers.

In the first project a student would design and document how to hack a stuffed animal to be used as an input device similar to a joystick or arrow and a few other keys to allow a nonverbal child to use their favorite stuffed animal as an input device.

Level: beginner
Skills required: Maker skills. To Hack a stuffed animal. Etoys (If student knows Scratch, they can learn the skills needed in Etoys for this project)

In the second project a student would design a set of picture boards that could be navigated using a joystick or arrow keys and arrow and few other keys.  The project would also allow a parent or teacher to simply add and re-arrange pictures using a webcam, imported pictures or simple drawings that can be made using Etoys[1].  Etoys runs on Linux, Windows and Mac OS and is one of the core applications in the OLPC XO.

Level: beginner
Skills required: Etoys (If student knows Scratch, they can learn the skills needed in Etoys for this project)

Mentor:
Stephen Thomas <[hidden email]>

[1] http://squeakland.org/


On Sun, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:07 AM, Bert Freudenberg <[hidden email]> wrote:
1. Make Etoys work on SqueakJS

Increasingly, there are systems that do not support web browser plugins, or that even disallow installing certain software without "jailbreaking". Even if the system would support it, some administrators disallow installing of custom plugins. This presents a problem for Squeak/Etoys [1] which is used in schools world-wide, but cannot be installed on more and more systems. The single commonly supported runtime system is HTML5 + Javascript. SqueakJS [2] is a Squeak VM running on top of Javascript, on various platforms.

In this project, a student would extend SqueakJS to be able to run an Etoys image. It should provide an experience similar to running the Squeak Plugin VM in a web browser: load a project from a URL and allow uploading modified projects. The initial version does not need to be very performant, speed optimizations can be done when we have a working system.

Level: advanced
Skills required: JavaScript, Smalltalk

Mentor: Bert Freudenberg <[hidden email]>

[1] http://squeakland.org/
[2] http://bertfreudenberg.github.io/SqueakJS/

===================================================================

2. Port Squeak/Etoys to Chrome OS

Many schools are buying Chromebooks [1] because they are cheap and easy to maintain. Squeakland [2] has gotten multiple requests to make Etoys work on these machines. The best way to do this is running a Squeak VM via Native Client [3].

Yoshiki Ohshima started such a VM port [4] demonstrating the feasibility. His sources are available on github. They need to be updated to work with a current NaCl SDK, and a portable VM must be built (PNaCl). It needs to be tested on actual Chrome book hardware as well as a Chrome browser on PCs. Support for downloading and uploading projects must be implemented so it can be used as a direct replacement for the Squeak browser plugin.

Level: medium
Skills required: C, Smalltalk

Mentors:
Yoshiki Ohshima <[hidden email]>
Bert Freudenberg <[hidden email]>

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromebook
[2] http://squeakland.org/
[3] https://developers.google.com/native-client
[4] http://lists.squeak.org/pipermail/vm-dev/2011-May/007991.html

- Bert -



_______________________________________________
etoys-dev mailing list
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--

To some of us, writing computer programs is a fascinating game. A program is a building of thought. It is costless to build, weightless, growing easily under our typing hands. If we get carried away, its size and complexity will grow out of control, confusing even the one who created it. This is the main problem of programming. It is why so much of today's software tends to crash, fail, screw up.

When a program works, it is beautiful. The art of programming is the skill of controlling complexity. The great program is subdued, made simple in its complexity.

- Martin Harverbeke (from Eloquent JavaScript)




--

To some of us, writing computer programs is a fascinating game. A program is a building of thought. It is costless to build, weightless, growing easily under our typing hands. If we get carried away, its size and complexity will grow out of control, confusing even the one who created it. This is the main problem of programming. It is why so much of today's software tends to crash, fail, screw up.

When a program works, it is beautiful. The art of programming is the skill of controlling complexity. The great program is subdued, made simple in its complexity.

- Martin Harverbeke (from Eloquent JavaScript)


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Re: [etoys-dev] [gsoc-mentors] [GSoC ideas] Squeak/Etoys

Serge Stinckwich-2
Dear all,

is there any Smalltalk development involved in this project ?

Regards,

On Mon, Feb 17, 2014 at 11:23 PM, Steve Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Kathleen,
>
> Great feedback, thanks.  Below is an updated version:
>
> Many children can not communicate verbally whether due to nonverbal autism
> or some other factor.  While there are many catalogs and websites with
> adaptive equipment and software but the prices are high.  There is a OLPC
> deployment in Uraguay where a student uses his stuffed animal as an input
> device for using an XO and Etoys.  We would like to build on this to make it
> easier and lower cost or these children and their parents to communicate and
> use computers.  The software would be free and OpenSource and the hardware
> to hack a Stuffed Animal could potentially repurpose old keyboards [2] or
> under $10 by repurposing a used USB game controller (free if kids donate
> their old ones).
>
> In the first project a student would design and document how to hack a
> stuffed animal to be used as an input device similar to a joystick or arrow
> and a few other keys to allow a nonverbal child to use their favorite
> stuffed animal as an input device.
>
> Level: beginner
> Skills required: Maker skills. To Hack a stuffed animal. Etoys (If student
> knows Scratch, they can learn the skills needed in Etoys for this project)
>
> In the second project a student would design a set of picture boards that
> could be navigated using a joystick or arrow keys and arrow and few other
> keys.  The project would also allow a parent or teacher to simply add and
> re-arrange pictures using a webcam, imported pictures or simple drawings
> that can be made using Etoys[1].  Etoys runs on Linux, Windows and Mac OS
> and is one of the core applications in the OLPC XO.
>
> Level: beginner
> Skills required: Etoys (If student knows Scratch, they can learn the skills
> needed in Etoys for this project)
>
> Mentor:
> Stephen Thomas <[hidden email]>
>
> [1] http://squeakland.org/
> [2] http://www.instructables.com/id/Hacking-a-USB-Keyboard/?ALLSTEPS
>
> On Mon, Feb 17, 2014 at 11:23 AM, Harness, Kathleen <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>>
>> Steve,
>> You may want to emphasize in the application that this is a low cost
>> adaptive technology. There are many catalogs and websites with adaptive
>> equipment and software but the prices are high. A cost comparison might be
>> persuasive.
>> Regards,
>> Kathleen
>> ________________________________
>> From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]]
>> on behalf of Steve Thomas [[hidden email]]
>> Sent: Monday, February 17, 2014 12:19 AM
>> To: Bert Freudenberg
>> Cc: [hidden email]; etoys dev; Paolo Bonzini; The
>> general-purpose Squeak developers list
>>
>> Subject: Re: [etoys-dev] [gsoc-mentors] [GSoC ideas] Squeak/Etoys
>>
>> Many children can not communicate verbally whether due to nonverbal autism
>> or some other factor.  There is a OLPC deployment in Uraguay where a student
>> uses his stuffed animal as an input device for using an XO and Etoys.  We
>> would like to build on this to make it easier and cheaper for these children
>> and their parents to communicate and use computers.
>>
>> In the first project a student would design and document how to hack a
>> stuffed animal to be used as an input device similar to a joystick or arrow
>> and a few other keys to allow a nonverbal child to use their favorite
>> stuffed animal as an input device.
>>
>> Level: beginner
>> Skills required: Maker skills. To Hack a stuffed animal. Etoys (If student
>> knows Scratch, they can learn the skills needed in Etoys for this project)
>>
>> In the second project a student would design a set of picture boards that
>> could be navigated using a joystick or arrow keys and arrow and few other
>> keys.  The project would also allow a parent or teacher to simply add and
>> re-arrange pictures using a webcam, imported pictures or simple drawings
>> that can be made using Etoys[1].  Etoys runs on Linux, Windows and Mac OS
>> and is one of the core applications in the OLPC XO.
>>
>> Level: beginner
>> Skills required: Etoys (If student knows Scratch, they can learn the
>> skills needed in Etoys for this project)
>>
>> Mentor:
>> Stephen Thomas <[hidden email]>
>>
>> [1] http://squeakland.org/
>>
>>
>> On Sun, Feb 16, 2014 at 11:07 AM, Bert Freudenberg <[hidden email]>
>> wrote:
>>>
>>> 1. Make Etoys work on SqueakJS
>>>
>>> Increasingly, there are systems that do not support web browser plugins,
>>> or that even disallow installing certain software without "jailbreaking".
>>> Even if the system would support it, some administrators disallow installing
>>> of custom plugins. This presents a problem for Squeak/Etoys [1] which is
>>> used in schools world-wide, but cannot be installed on more and more
>>> systems. The single commonly supported runtime system is HTML5 + Javascript.
>>> SqueakJS [2] is a Squeak VM running on top of Javascript, on various
>>> platforms.
>>>
>>> In this project, a student would extend SqueakJS to be able to run an
>>> Etoys image. It should provide an experience similar to running the Squeak
>>> Plugin VM in a web browser: load a project from a URL and allow uploading
>>> modified projects. The initial version does not need to be very performant,
>>> speed optimizations can be done when we have a working system.
>>>
>>> Level: advanced
>>> Skills required: JavaScript, Smalltalk
>>>
>>> Mentor: Bert Freudenberg <[hidden email]>
>>>
>>> [1] http://squeakland.org/
>>> [2] http://bertfreudenberg.github.io/SqueakJS/
>>>
>>> ===================================================================
>>>
>>> 2. Port Squeak/Etoys to Chrome OS
>>>
>>> Many schools are buying Chromebooks [1] because they are cheap and easy
>>> to maintain. Squeakland [2] has gotten multiple requests to make Etoys work
>>> on these machines. The best way to do this is running a Squeak VM via Native
>>> Client [3].
>>>
>>> Yoshiki Ohshima started such a VM port [4] demonstrating the feasibility.
>>> His sources are available on github. They need to be updated to work with a
>>> current NaCl SDK, and a portable VM must be built (PNaCl). It needs to be
>>> tested on actual Chrome book hardware as well as a Chrome browser on PCs.
>>> Support for downloading and uploading projects must be implemented so it can
>>> be used as a direct replacement for the Squeak browser plugin.
>>>
>>> Level: medium
>>> Skills required: C, Smalltalk
>>>
>>> Mentors:
>>> Yoshiki Ohshima <[hidden email]>
>>> Bert Freudenberg <[hidden email]>
>>>
>>> [1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromebook
>>> [2] http://squeakland.org/
>>> [3] https://developers.google.com/native-client
>>> [4] http://lists.squeak.org/pipermail/vm-dev/2011-May/007991.html
>>>
>>> - Bert -
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> etoys-dev mailing list
>>> [hidden email]
>>> http://lists.squeakland.org/mailman/listinfo/etoys-dev
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> To some of us, writing computer programs is a fascinating game. A program
>> is a building of thought. It is costless to build, weightless, growing
>> easily under our typing hands. If we get carried away, its size and
>> complexity will grow out of control, confusing even the one who created it.
>> This is the main problem of programming. It is why so much of today's
>> software tends to crash, fail, screw up.
>>
>> When a program works, it is beautiful. The art of programming is the skill
>> of controlling complexity. The great program is subdued, made simple in its
>> complexity.
>>
>> - Martin Harverbeke (from Eloquent JavaScript)
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> To some of us, writing computer programs is a fascinating game. A program is
> a building of thought. It is costless to build, weightless, growing easily
> under our typing hands. If we get carried away, its size and complexity will
> grow out of control, confusing even the one who created it. This is the main
> problem of programming. It is why so much of today's software tends to
> crash, fail, screw up.
>
> When a program works, it is beautiful. The art of programming is the skill
> of controlling complexity. The great program is subdued, made simple in its
> complexity.
>
> - Martin Harverbeke (from Eloquent JavaScript)
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> etoys-dev mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://lists.squeakland.org/mailman/listinfo/etoys-dev
>



--
Serge Stinckwich
UCBN & UMI UMMISCO 209 (IRD/UPMC)
Every DSL ends up being Smalltalk
http://www.doesnotunderstand.org/
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Re: [etoys-dev] [gsoc-mentors] [GSoC ideas] Squeak/Etoys

Steve Thomas
There is development within Etoys involved. But at the tile scripting level, not necessarily at the Smalltalk level.

Stephen

On Tuesday, February 18, 2014, Serge Stinckwich <[hidden email]> wrote:
Dear all,

is there any Smalltalk development involved in this project ?

Regards,

On Mon, Feb 17, 2014 at 11:23 PM, Steve Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Kathleen,
>
> Great feedback, thanks.  Below is an updated version:
>
> Many children can not communicate verbally whether due to nonverbal autism
> or some other factor.  While there are many catalogs and websites with
> adaptive equipment and software but the prices are high.  There is a OLPC
> deployment in Uraguay where a student uses his stuffed animal as an input
> device for using an XO and Etoys.  We would like to build on this to make it
> easier and lower cost or these children and their parents to communicate and
> use computers.  The software would be free and OpenSource and the hardware
> to hack a Stuffed Animal could potentially repurpose old keyboards [2] or
> under $10 by repurposing a used USB game controller (free if kids donate
> their old ones).
>
> In the first project a student would design and document how to hack a
> stuffed animal to be used as an input device similar to a joystick or arrow
> and a few other keys to allow a nonverbal child to use their favorite
> stuffed animal as an input device.
>
> Level: beginner
> Skills required: Maker skills. To Hack a stuffed animal. Etoys (If student
> knows Scratch, they can learn the skills needed in Etoys for this project)
>
> In the second project a student would design a set of picture boards that
> could be navigated using a joystick or arrow keys and arrow and few other
> keys.  The project would also allow a parent or teacher to simply add and
> re-arrange pictures using a webcam, imported pictures or simple drawings
> that can be made using Etoys[1].  Etoys runs on Linux, Windows and Mac OS
> and is one of the core applications in the OLPC XO.
>
> Level: beginner
> Skills required: Etoys (If student knows Scratch, they can learn the skills
> needed in Etoys for this project)
>
> Mentor:
> Stephen Thomas <[hidden email]>
>
> [1] http://squeakland.org/
> [2] http://www.instructables.com/id/Hacking-a-USB-Keyboard/?ALLSTEPS
>
> On Mon, Feb 17, 2014 at 11:23 AM, Harness, Kathleen <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>>
>> Steve,
>> You may want to emphasize in the application that this is a low cost
>> adaptive technology. There are many catalogs and websites with adaptive
>> equipment and software but the prices are high. A cost comparison might be
>> persuasive.
>> Regards,
>> Kathleen
>> ________________________________
>> From: [hidden email] [[hidden email]]
>> on behalf of Steve Thomas [[hidden email]]
>> Sent: Monday, February 17, 2014 12:19 AM
>> To: Bert Freudenberg
>> Cc: [hidden email]; etoys dev; Paolo Bonzini; The
>> general-purpose Squeak developers list
>>
>> Subject: Re: [etoys-dev] [gsoc-mentors] [GSoC ideas] Squeak/Etoys
>>
>> Many children can not communicate verbally whether due to nonverbal autism
>> or some other factor.  There is a OLPC deployment in Uraguay where a student
>> uses his stuffed animal as an input device for using an XO and Etoys.  We
>> would like to build on this to make it easier and cheaper for these children
>> and their parents to communicate and use computers.
>>
>> In the first project a student would design and document how to hack a
>> stuffed animal to be used as an input device similar to a joystick or arrow
>> and a few other keys to allow a nonverbal child to use their favorite
>> stuffed animal as an input device.
>>
>> Level: beginner
>> Skills required: Maker skills. To Hack a stuffedSerge Stinckwich
UCBN & UMI UMMISCO 209 (IRD/UPMC)
Every DSL ends up being Smalltalk
http://www.doesnotunderstand.org/


--

To some of us, writing computer programs is a fascinating game. A program is a building of thought. It is costless to build, weightless, growing easily under our typing hands. If we get carried away, its size and complexity will grow out of control, confusing even the one who created it. This is the main problem of programming. It is why so much of today's software tends to crash, fail, screw up.

When a program works, it is beautiful. The art of programming is the skill of controlling complexity. The great program is subdued, made simple in its complexity.

- Martin Harverbeke (from Eloquent JavaScript)



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[etoys-dev] [GSoC ideas] Squeak: General collaboration support for Etoys

Bert Freudenberg
In reply to this post by Bert Freudenberg
Etoys [1] is pre-installed on millions of OLPC XO-Laptops worldwide [2]. Running under Sugar [3] (the XO's Linux-based UI) it provides collaboration support for class rooms: students can send scripted objects to each other to easily combine their work.

In a non-Sugar system (Mac, Windows, regular Linux) this collaboration support is not readily available. The code is there, but to use it students would have to manually enter IP addresses, because the discovery protocol relies on Sugar's "presence service".

To a user this should look very simple: She pops up a window which lists all the other Etoys users nearby, so she can choose one to connect to. Then the two can exchange messages and objects. The latter part is already there, what is needed is the discovery of other users.

The task would be to make the collaboration work on a wider range of systems. One approach would be using the Telepathy framework [4] which is underlying Sugar's presence service (and in fact this would help Sugar, since they have phased out the PS and are using Telepathy directly). This should work easily under Linux, and might be portable to other platforms. Another advantage of this approach would be that Sugar users can collaborate with non-Sugar users, and across network boundaries (NAT etc).

Alternatively, a simple broadcast-based protocol could be created. The advantage would be that it would work identically on all platforms and not require system support. It may, however, be less robust and general than what Telepathy provides. It might also interfere with other network services. Also, collaboration between Sugar- and non-Sugar users might be problematic. The simplicity of this approach may outweigh the disadvantages, though.

Level: medium to advanced depending on approach

Skills: Smalltalk, Networking (plus DBus and cross-platform development if using Telepathy)

Mentor: Bert Freudenberg <[hidden email]>

[1] http://squeakland.org/
[2] http://laptop.org/
[3] http://sugarlabs.org/
[4] http://telepathy.freedesktop.org/
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Re: [etoys-dev] [GSoC ideas] Squeak: General collaboration support for Etoys

Karl Ramberg
This would be great!
 
Cheers,
Karl


 
On Wed, Feb 19, 2014 at 10:40 AM, Bert Freudenberg <[hidden email]> wrote:
Etoys [1] is pre-installed on millions of OLPC XO-Laptops worldwide [2]. Running under Sugar [3] (the XO's Linux-based UI) it provides collaboration support for class rooms: students can send scripted objects to each other to easily combine their work.

In a non-Sugar system (Mac, Windows, regular Linux) this collaboration support is not readily available. The code is there, but to use it students would have to manually enter IP addresses, because the discovery protocol relies on Sugar's "presence service".

To a user this should look very simple: She pops up a window which lists all the other Etoys users nearby, so she can choose one to connect to. Then the two can exchange messages and objects. The latter part is already there, what is needed is the discovery of other users.

The task would be to make the collaboration work on a wider range of systems. One approach would be using the Telepathy framework [4] which is underlying Sugar's presence service (and in fact this would help Sugar, since they have phased out the PS and are using Telepathy directly). This should work easily under Linux, and might be portable to other platforms. Another advantage of this approach would be that Sugar users can collaborate with non-Sugar users, and across network boundaries (NAT etc).

Alternatively, a simple broadcast-based protocol could be created. The advantage would be that it would work identically on all platforms and not require system support. It may, however, be less robust and general than what Telepathy provides. It might also interfere with other network services. Also, collaboration between Sugar- and non-Sugar users might be problematic. The simplicity of this approach may outweigh the disadvantages, though.

Level: medium to advanced depending on approach

Skills: Smalltalk, Networking (plus DBus and cross-platform development if using Telepathy)

Mentor: Bert Freudenberg <[hidden email]>

[1] http://squeakland.org/
[2] http://laptop.org/
[3] http://sugarlabs.org/
[4] http://telepathy.freedesktop.org/
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