Re: Sugar Labs introduction

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Re: Sugar Labs introduction

Yamandu Ploskonka
oh yes, totally.

Neal Scoggin was all for a certification program.

OLE had a similar view about local concerns doing local things.  This is
particularly liffe-and-death in places where American-organization
presence is not wholly welcome, and where alternate sources of funding
might favor local institutions.  Moreover, this can open very
interesting venues for places like Bolivia where the govenrment wants to
favor Open Source providers, but there is none locally able to take part
in project bids.

Yama


David Farning wrote:

> We are facing the same problem in Columbia. There is a very strong
> group that is having trouble being recognized because they are not
> official.
>
> So far we are working on two parallel solutions, Local Labs and Sugar
> Partners.  Local Labs will be very autonomous, NFP organization that
> in some way support the Sugar Labs mission.  It will be pretty easy to
> have Local Labs recognized as official NFPs under the umbrella of
> Sugar Labs.
>
> The second solution is official Sugar Labs Partners.  These are for
> profit business that would like to be 'Sugar Certified.'
>
>
> Please take a look at http://sugarlabs.org/go/Regional_Sugar_Labs :)
> I hope to get them going by the end of the week.
>
> thanks
> david
>
> On Sat, Nov 29, 2008 at 1:13 PM, Yamandu Ploskonka <[hidden email]> wrote:
>  
>> One thing that we need to see is about giving legitimacy to volunteers in
>> countries where only if you have an "official" piece of paper you are to be
>> taken into account.  Right now I have an active, enthusiastic, capable
>> volunteer in Uruguay who is not taken into account by higher authorities
>> because he basically is "nobody".
>>
>> A Sugarlabs "credential" or some sort of accreditation?
>>
>> Yama
>>
>>
>> David Farning wrote:
>>    
>>> Hey Caroline, Silas, Yama
>>>
>>> Would you be interested helping setup the 'charter' Local Labs[1] for
>>> Sugar Labs.  A lot of this has been inspired by combining Silas' ideas
>>> on how to collaborate between developed regions and underdeveloped
>>> regions, Yama's experience, and working Ubuntu LoCo teams.
>>>
>>> I would appreciate your feedback on the implementation of Local Labs.
>>>
>>> thanks
>>> david
>>>
>>> 1. http://sugarlabs.org/go/Regional_Sugar_Labs
>>>
>>>
>>> On Thu, Nov 27, 2008 at 6:44 PM, Caroline Meeks
>>> <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>>      
>>>> Hi Silas,
>>>>
>>>> How are things going? I'm sorry your email got burried during the Sugar
>>>> Labs
>>>> conference and just resurfaced.
>>>>
>>>> On Thu, Nov 13, 2008 at 4:39 PM, Silas Bernardoni <[hidden email]>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>        
>>>>> Caroline,
>>>>>
>>>>> I plan on looking into the moodle more this weekend.  I have a test
>>>>> tomorrow morning and then I'm facilitating a campus visit for our high
>>>>> school bridge design contest along with the Diversity Affairs Office for
>>>>> the
>>>>> College of Engineering.  (Way too much on one day!)
>>>>>
>>>>> We have a project meeting on Monday where all the teachers using XOs in
>>>>> the city will share their lesson plans and giving their updates.  I plan
>>>>> on
>>>>> pushing the moodle during the meeting with the hope of loading the
>>>>> moodle
>>>>> with content within the next week.  I'll keep you informed on how that
>>>>> goes.
>>>>>  We should also talk about how we are setting up our student
>>>>> organization
>>>>> and how I am planning on contributing to Sugar and OLPC.
>>>>>
>>>>>          
>>>> How did your meeting go?
>>>>
>>>>        
>>>>> I am also planning on doing my graduate research on the effectiveness of
>>>>> Sugar and the XO starting in January.  The plan is to do small scale
>>>>> testing
>>>>> here in Madison and then do large scale testing (3,700 XOs) in Paraguay
>>>>> over
>>>>> the summer.  I would like to talk to you about the area of educational
>>>>> open
>>>>> source software and get your views on what should be evaluated.  I look
>>>>> forward to working with you.  I've had a wonderful experience with
>>>>> everyone
>>>>> in the Sugar community.  It's amazing how many good things are happening
>>>>> here on our campus with this project!
>>>>>
>>>>>          
>>>> This sounds great.  I'm sure you know quite a bit more about assessment
>>>> then
>>>> I do. Here are somethings I'm curious about.  In countries that are
>>>> already
>>>> doing standardized testing what results are the tests showing?
>>>>
>>>> In classes that are getting good results what is happening?  So digging
>>>> beyond the gross statistics and trying to find out what things create the
>>>> best results.  In the classes I've taken they say one of the things that
>>>> makes evaluating educational technology hard is that it takes the
>>>> teachers a
>>>> year or two to get the hang of teaching with the new technolgoy. This has
>>>> to
>>>> be even more so in developing countries.  So average statistics may not
>>>> tell
>>>> us much useful initially.  Ideally I'd like to see research that could be
>>>> used as feedback to teacher training.
>>>>
>>>> The Wendy Kopp, the founder of Teach for America spoke at Harvard
>>>> recently
>>>> and talked about how they have been trying to learn from the few teachers
>>>> who really are effective at significantly changing the trajectories of
>>>> the
>>>> thier students.  They then are putting that back into thier training and
>>>> trying to boost the percentage of people who become those exceptionally
>>>> effective teachers. I think that would be a wonderful model to follow. If
>>>> that falls within your interestes perhaps they would share thier
>>>> evaluation
>>>> techniques.
>>>>
>>>> Look forward to hearing more.  Lets set up a time to talk voice.
>>>>
>>>> Again, sorry for losing your email!
>>>>
>>>> Cheers,
>>>> Caroline
>>>>
>>>>        
>>>>> Silas
>>>>>
>>>>> Silas Bernardoni
>>>>> Industrial and Systems Engineering
>>>>> University of Wisconsin- Madison
>>>>> Office: B1026 ECB
>>>>> [hidden email]
>>>>> (608)482-0255
>>>>>
>>>>> ----- Original Message -----
>>>>> From: Caroline Meeks <[hidden email]>
>>>>> Date: Thursday, November 13, 2008 10:13 am
>>>>> Subject: Re: Sugar Labs introduction
>>>>> To: David Farning <[hidden email]>
>>>>> Cc: Silas Bernardoni <[hidden email]>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>          
>>>>>> hi Silas,
>>>>>>
>>>>>> nice to meet you!  Please let me knowif you need any help with
>>>>>> schools.sugarlabs.org and I'm looking forward to learning more about
>>>>>> your
>>>>>> project.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Cheers,
>>>>>> Caroline
>>>>>>
>>>>>> On Wed, Nov 12, 2008 at 4:27 PM, David Farning
>>>>>> <[hidden email]>wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>            
>>>>>>> Hey Caroline and Silas,
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I wanted to make sure that the two of you were aware of each other's
>>>>>>> work.  I met Silas a few weeks ago at the University of Wisconsin -
>>>>>>> Madison.  He is the leader of a OLPC - student organization that the
>>>>>>> university.  The chapter currently has ~100 XO deployed around the
>>>>>>> city at schools and community centers.  There is also a research lab
>>>>>>> set up in the School of engineering with another 10 XO to work on.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> They are working on a lot of problems that I would consider outside
>>>>>>> the primary scope of Sugar Labs, but very useful nonetheless.  The are
>>>>>>> great projects for proving the worth of the distributed development
>>>>>>> model of Sugar Labs.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> He, and the Madison chapter, are working closely with Paraguay to
>>>>>>> develop a model where Madison support the Paraguay deployment remotely
>>>>>>> and physically.  I believe I cced you into a conversation about
>>>>>>> Paraguay last week.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I met Caroline at an Open Source in education conference a few months
>>>>>>> ago.  Since then, she has been instrumental in driving the Sugar on
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>              
>>>>>> a
>>>>>>
>>>>>>            
>>>>>>> stick work forward.  Her contributions have been mostly in the form
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>              
>>>>>> of
>>>>>>
>>>>>>            
>>>>>>> high quality feedback to the developers about what she, as an
>>>>>>> educator, needs in the classroom.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Caroline's company, Solutions Grove, is hosting the moodle server at
>>>>>>> schools.sugarlabs.org.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Silas's long term interest in the project is in measuring the
>>>>>>> effectiveness of the XO and Sugar as learning and teaching tools.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> In the short term, he has agreed to help seed the content at
>>>>>>> schools.sugarlabs.org!
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> thanks
>>>>>>> david
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>              
>>>>>> --
>>>>>> Caroline Meeks
>>>>>> Solution Grove
>>>>>> [hidden email]
>>>>>>
>>>>>> 617-500-3488 - Office
>>>>>> 505-213-3268 - Fax
>>>>>>
>>>>>>            
>>>> --
>>>> Caroline Meeks
>>>> Solution Grove
>>>> [hidden email]
>>>>
>>>> 617-500-3488 - Office
>>>> 505-213-3268 - Fax
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>        
>>>      
>
>  
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Re: Sugar Labs introduction

Rafael Enrique Ortiz Guerrero
Hello Yama, David all.


Some thoughts,

It's definitely  really important to have an official certification or support from SugarLabs international because as you now in our countries it's really difficult to get moving without a paper that says so..

For example here in Colombia,  OLPC/Sugar pilots are beginning to get managed by Companies or Foundations, with needs for money but not with needs for doing things well or loving what they are doing ;).

Barely they are beginning to understand the project, but they are  
truly advanced in relation to contracts.($$$).

In addition to this, they are not even remotely interested in free software communities...and in some way the liberties are getting compromised.

Fortunately sugar labs is seeing the foundation of regional sugarlabs as an opportunity and not as a drawback (as maybe OLPC sees it, don't know why though)

So as David says there are two schemes, and people in countries can begin to adjust to one or another.

In relation to OLE Sugarlabs, I see OLE in a higher level than SugarLabs, the relation between them has to be reciprocal but OLE can group a broaden stile or kind  of efforts related to education,

Rafael Ortiz


On Fri, Nov 28, 2008 at 3:05 PM, Yamandu Ploskonka <[hidden email]> wrote:
oh yes, totally.

Neal Scoggin was all for a certification program.

OLE had a similar view about local concerns doing local things.  This is
particularly liffe-and-death in places where American-organization
presence is not wholly welcome, and where alternate sources of funding
might favor local institutions.  Moreover, this can open very
interesting venues for places like Bolivia where the govenrment wants to
favor Open Source providers, but there is none locally able to take part
in project bids.

Yama


David Farning wrote:
> We are facing the same problem in Columbia. There is a very strong
> group that is having trouble being recognized because they are not
> official.
>
> So far we are working on two parallel solutions, Local Labs and Sugar
> Partners.  Local Labs will be very autonomous, NFP organization that
> in some way support the Sugar Labs mission.  It will be pretty easy to
> have Local Labs recognized as official NFPs under the umbrella of
> Sugar Labs.
>
> The second solution is official Sugar Labs Partners.  These are for
> profit business that would like to be 'Sugar Certified.'
>
>
> Please take a look at http://sugarlabs.org/go/Regional_Sugar_Labs :)
> I hope to get them going by the end of the week.
>
> thanks
> david
>
> On Sat, Nov 29, 2008 at 1:13 PM, Yamandu Ploskonka <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> One thing that we need to see is about giving legitimacy to volunteers in
>> countries where only if you have an "official" piece of paper you are to be
>> taken into account.  Right now I have an active, enthusiastic, capable
>> volunteer in Uruguay who is not taken into account by higher authorities
>> because he basically is "nobody".
>>
>> A Sugarlabs "credential" or some sort of accreditation?
>>
>> Yama
>>
>>
>> David Farning wrote:
>>
>>> Hey Caroline, Silas, Yama
>>>
>>> Would you be interested helping setup the 'charter' Local Labs[1] for
>>> Sugar Labs.  A lot of this has been inspired by combining Silas' ideas
>>> on how to collaborate between developed regions and underdeveloped
>>> regions, Yama's experience, and working Ubuntu LoCo teams.
>>>
>>> I would appreciate your feedback on the implementation of Local Labs.
>>>
>>> thanks
>>> david
>>>
>>> 1. http://sugarlabs.org/go/Regional_Sugar_Labs
>>>
>>>
>>> On Thu, Nov 27, 2008 at 6:44 PM, Caroline Meeks
>>> <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>> Hi Silas,
>>>>
>>>> How are things going? I'm sorry your email got burried during the Sugar
>>>> Labs
>>>> conference and just resurfaced.
>>>>
>>>> On Thu, Nov 13, 2008 at 4:39 PM, Silas Bernardoni <[hidden email]>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> Caroline,
>>>>>
>>>>> I plan on looking into the moodle more this weekend.  I have a test
>>>>> tomorrow morning and then I'm facilitating a campus visit for our high
>>>>> school bridge design contest along with the Diversity Affairs Office for
>>>>> the
>>>>> College of Engineering.  (Way too much on one day!)
>>>>>
>>>>> We have a project meeting on Monday where all the teachers using XOs in
>>>>> the city will share their lesson plans and giving their updates.  I plan
>>>>> on
>>>>> pushing the moodle during the meeting with the hope of loading the
>>>>> moodle
>>>>> with content within the next week.  I'll keep you informed on how that
>>>>> goes.
>>>>>  We should also talk about how we are setting up our student
>>>>> organization
>>>>> and how I am planning on contributing to Sugar and OLPC.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>> How did your meeting go?
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> I am also planning on doing my graduate research on the effectiveness of
>>>>> Sugar and the XO starting in January.  The plan is to do small scale
>>>>> testing
>>>>> here in Madison and then do large scale testing (3,700 XOs) in Paraguay
>>>>> over
>>>>> the summer.  I would like to talk to you about the area of educational
>>>>> open
>>>>> source software and get your views on what should be evaluated.  I look
>>>>> forward to working with you.  I've had a wonderful experience with
>>>>> everyone
>>>>> in the Sugar community.  It's amazing how many good things are happening
>>>>> here on our campus with this project!
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>> This sounds great.  I'm sure you know quite a bit more about assessment
>>>> then
>>>> I do. Here are somethings I'm curious about.  In countries that are
>>>> already
>>>> doing standardized testing what results are the tests showing?
>>>>
>>>> In classes that are getting good results what is happening?  So digging
>>>> beyond the gross statistics and trying to find out what things create the
>>>> best results.  In the classes I've taken they say one of the things that
>>>> makes evaluating educational technology hard is that it takes the
>>>> teachers a
>>>> year or two to get the hang of teaching with the new technolgoy. This has
>>>> to
>>>> be even more so in developing countries.  So average statistics may not
>>>> tell
>>>> us much useful initially.  Ideally I'd like to see research that could be
>>>> used as feedback to teacher training.
>>>>
>>>> The Wendy Kopp, the founder of Teach for America spoke at Harvard
>>>> recently
>>>> and talked about how they have been trying to learn from the few teachers
>>>> who really are effective at significantly changing the trajectories of
>>>> the
>>>> thier students.  They then are putting that back into thier training and
>>>> trying to boost the percentage of people who become those exceptionally
>>>> effective teachers. I think that would be a wonderful model to follow. If
>>>> that falls within your interestes perhaps they would share thier
>>>> evaluation
>>>> techniques.
>>>>
>>>> Look forward to hearing more.  Lets set up a time to talk voice.
>>>>
>>>> Again, sorry for losing your email!
>>>>
>>>> Cheers,
>>>> Caroline
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> Silas
>>>>>
>>>>> Silas Bernardoni
>>>>> Industrial and Systems Engineering
>>>>> University of Wisconsin- Madison
>>>>> Office: B1026 ECB
>>>>> [hidden email]
>>>>> (608)482-0255
>>>>>
>>>>> ----- Original Message -----
>>>>> From: Caroline Meeks <[hidden email]>
>>>>> Date: Thursday, November 13, 2008 10:13 am
>>>>> Subject: Re: Sugar Labs introduction
>>>>> To: David Farning <[hidden email]>
>>>>> Cc: Silas Bernardoni <[hidden email]>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>> hi Silas,
>>>>>>
>>>>>> nice to meet you!  Please let me knowif you need any help with
>>>>>> schools.sugarlabs.org and I'm looking forward to learning more about
>>>>>> your
>>>>>> project.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Cheers,
>>>>>> Caroline
>>>>>>
>>>>>> On Wed, Nov 12, 2008 at 4:27 PM, David Farning
>>>>>> <[hidden email]>wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Hey Caroline and Silas,
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I wanted to make sure that the two of you were aware of each other's
>>>>>>> work.  I met Silas a few weeks ago at the University of Wisconsin -
>>>>>>> Madison.  He is the leader of a OLPC - student organization that the
>>>>>>> university.  The chapter currently has ~100 XO deployed around the
>>>>>>> city at schools and community centers.  There is also a research lab
>>>>>>> set up in the School of engineering with another 10 XO to work on.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> They are working on a lot of problems that I would consider outside
>>>>>>> the primary scope of Sugar Labs, but very useful nonetheless.  The are
>>>>>>> great projects for proving the worth of the distributed development
>>>>>>> model of Sugar Labs.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> He, and the Madison chapter, are working closely with Paraguay to
>>>>>>> develop a model where Madison support the Paraguay deployment remotely
>>>>>>> and physically.  I believe I cced you into a conversation about
>>>>>>> Paraguay last week.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I met Caroline at an Open Source in education conference a few months
>>>>>>> ago.  Since then, she has been instrumental in driving the Sugar on
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>> a
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> stick work forward.  Her contributions have been mostly in the form
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>> of
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> high quality feedback to the developers about what she, as an
>>>>>>> educator, needs in the classroom.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Caroline's company, Solutions Grove, is hosting the moodle server at
>>>>>>> schools.sugarlabs.org.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Silas's long term interest in the project is in measuring the
>>>>>>> effectiveness of the XO and Sugar as learning and teaching tools.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> In the short term, he has agreed to help seed the content at
>>>>>>> schools.sugarlabs.org!
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> thanks
>>>>>>> david
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>> --
>>>>>> Caroline Meeks
>>>>>> Solution Grove
>>>>>> [hidden email]
>>>>>>
>>>>>> 617-500-3488 - Office
>>>>>> 505-213-3268 - Fax
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Caroline Meeks
>>>> Solution Grove
>>>> [hidden email]
>>>>
>>>> 617-500-3488 - Office
>>>> 505-213-3268 - Fax
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>
>
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http://lists.laptop.org/listinfo/sugar


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Re: Sugar Labs introduction

Sebastian Silva-2
Hello,
I realize I should have jumped into this discussion earlier. Please
excuse me, I've just put myself thru an intense matrixesque
self-learning weeks around learning communities, communities of
practice, community learning, critical pedagogy, radical pedagogy,
network logics (economies, brains, forests, evolution, the internet),
network economics, ecology, emergent control, beekeeping, and
de-centralized governance... it's been fascinating.
My research question has been "¿how to jumpstart an ecosystem?"

The reason for my research is because I've been looking for a
sustainability model for our FuenteLibre.Org grassroots initiative.
I'll briefly relate our story: Born peruvian, raised in Chile,
came to Lima where I have familiy a year ago to volunteer for OLPC.
Got into suport-gang, eek,
support for G1G1? So Walter comes, brings me an XO laptop, I meet
Hernan Pachas from the ministry, and I offer to organize volunteers
for support and training, etc. At the time, they had their hands full
(and their heads), so they informed me they would not be working with
volunteers, "they would handle it" and that "I should not worry about
it".

I understood immediately that for this project to succeed, it needed
community involvement and transparency. I rallied for volunteers and
got over 150 emails from educators, techies and all sorts of people
accross Perú interested in helping out. I tailored a Xubuntu+Sugar
LiveCD in spanish for download. Alas, as yama puts it, I was "nobody",
so we were left out of helping out in the deployment and were pointed
to "boring" (but important) stuff like translating the wiki. This was
very frustrating and I will not make this mistake again. This is not
to say we wont translate - its part of our mission too.

Now back to the point, Regional SugarLabs. I investigated the Ubuntu
LoCoTeam "model" if there is such a thing. I found none, sorry to say,
only a Howto describing very crude "how to run a team" and "what a
team can do". It does not go into the relation to the mission a local
group should have, the relationship it would have with SL central
("explicit connections outside" mantra). It also does not touch into
the organizational principles or the strategies or goals of a
relationship.

The ubuntu LoCo team is explicitly compared to Linux user groups, that
is, interest groups, fan clubs. That is what it is, basically, a fan
club. Now I know sugar has fans, I'm one of them, but ubuntu has a
large user base and great momentum, neither of which sugar has. In the
spirit of the message being the medium, nobody is getting the message.

Regional SugarLabs should be highly autonomous, carry their own
identity and mission (which should significantly overlap or include
central sugarlabs's mission). They should agree on similar set of
values / principles and also joint set of goals. We just want to be
"community centers", nodes in a network, not "Regional Offices".
Basically this means recognition as local partners and ability to
collect donations for our efforts. The reason for this perhaps is
obvious: ¿How are we to expect peer recognition if our own structure
is vertical?

I'm thinking the problem is the underlying model of "aid" - developed
countries helping developing countries. How are we hoping to bridge
the divide with this mental model?
I suggest a diffent approach, an education project aproach for
de-centralized massive collaboration for learning communities.
FuenteLibre leverages Sugar fot this and hopes to explore the realm of
libre social networking (integrating Elgg with the schoolserver for
instance). This way the medium is the message. For supporting this
model I'll point you to some strategies in this book:
http://www.kk.org/newrules/ "New Rules for the New Economy" by Kevin
Kelly, in summary:

1) Embrace the Swarm.
2) Increasing Returns.
3) Plentitude, Not Scarcity.
4) Follow the Free.
5) Feed the Web First.
6) Let Go at the Top.
7) From Places to Spaces
8) No Harmony, All Flux.
9) Relationship Tech.
10) Opportunities Before Efficiencies.

So paraphrasing NN, regional sugarlabs Are Educations Projects, not
Software development projects. This is important, because as such, we
will be more involved in deployment / integration / training.
FuenteLibre, is currently involved in a potential deployment of 2300
desktop computers with Sugar and Ubuntu, and will be offering a
community learning workshop model for the regional education direction
tech team that will be deploying and supporting these 200 computer
labs.

We would be more like a community managed education technology
consultant non profit, community partner of sugarlabs and working
closely in accordance to whatever we agree. One of FuenteLibre's goals
is also to explore replicable / scalable governance model for learning
communities, so we would encourage more local groups with diverse
models / missions, and support and incubate them, provided they agree
to the givene set of principles.

This brings us to the principles, which I'm currently working on very
heavily for FuenteLibre, for to quote Greg again, in large
de-centralized projects, the values are the organization. One point
here where FuenteLibre has a strong commitment is with free software
and once our discourse and our legal personality (in the works) are in
place, we will lauch a campaign for rejecting propietary software in
education (this is also an example of why we shuold keep our own
identity).

I'll preparing the principles for FuenteLiber and our new site at
http://beta.fuentelibre.org/

Thanks for walking with me thru this, and thank you for your support
of our efforts!

I'll add my comments to the other stuff bellow.

Sebastian

2008/11/28 Rafael Enrique Ortiz Guerrero <[hidden email]>:
> For example here in Colombia,  OLPC/Sugar pilots are beginning to get
> managed by Companies or Foundations, with needs for money but not with needs
> for doing things well or loving what they are doing ;).



>
> Barely they are beginning to understand the project, but they are
> truly advanced in relation to contracts.($$$).
>
> In addition to this, they are not even remotely interested in free software
> communities...and in some way the liberties are getting compromised.

In our economies, there is not much meritorcracy. Contracts are gained
by influence. We grassroots geeks have no influence. You re our only
point of refernce for influence and we expect your full support
because we locally represent our shared principles that are being
compromised by these incumbents.

> So as David says there are two schemes, and people in countries can begin to
> adjust to one or another.
I'm very interested in this "company partner" scheme. Will be
monitoring and figuring how to make it work here as well.

>> > On Sat, Nov 29, 2008 at 1:13 PM, Yamandu Ploskonka
>> > <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> >
>> >> One thing that we need to see is about giving legitimacy to volunteers
>> >> in
>> >> countries where only if you have an "official" piece of paper you are
>> >> to be
>> >> taken into account.  Right now I have an active, enthusiastic, capable
>> >> volunteer in Uruguay who is not taken into account by higher
>> >> authorities
>> >> because he basically is "nobody".
>> >>
He must be my twin brother then! Please put us in touch.

PS: I'd like to have my blog on planet too, tags OLPC and Sugar... Thanks!!
--
Sebastian Silva
Iniciativa FuenteLibre
http://blog.sebastiansilva.com/
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Re: Sugar Labs introduction

Sebastian Silva-2
Oh, also found this to be relevant:
http://www.creatinglearningcommunities.org/etcetera/selflearning.htm
http://www.creatinglearningcommunities.org/book/internet/lamoreaux1.htm
http://alcob.com/new/alcom_alcob/alcom_alcob_disp.html

Cheers!

Sebastian

2008/12/1 Sebastian Silva <[hidden email]>:

> Hello,
> I realize I should have jumped into this discussion earlier. Please
> excuse me, I've just put myself thru an intense matrixesque
> self-learning weeks around learning communities, communities of
> practice, community learning, critical pedagogy, radical pedagogy,
> network logics (economies, brains, forests, evolution, the internet),
> network economics, ecology, emergent control, beekeeping, and
> de-centralized governance... it's been fascinating.
> My research question has been "¿how to jumpstart an ecosystem?"
>
> The reason for my research is because I've been looking for a
> sustainability model for our FuenteLibre.Org grassroots initiative.
> I'll briefly relate our story: Born peruvian, raised in Chile,
> came to Lima where I have familiy a year ago to volunteer for OLPC.
> Got into suport-gang, eek,
> support for G1G1? So Walter comes, brings me an XO laptop, I meet
> Hernan Pachas from the ministry, and I offer to organize volunteers
> for support and training, etc. At the time, they had their hands full
> (and their heads), so they informed me they would not be working with
> volunteers, "they would handle it" and that "I should not worry about
> it".
>
> I understood immediately that for this project to succeed, it needed
> community involvement and transparency. I rallied for volunteers and
> got over 150 emails from educators, techies and all sorts of people
> accross Perú interested in helping out. I tailored a Xubuntu+Sugar
> LiveCD in spanish for download. Alas, as yama puts it, I was "nobody",
> so we were left out of helping out in the deployment and were pointed
> to "boring" (but important) stuff like translating the wiki. This was
> very frustrating and I will not make this mistake again. This is not
> to say we wont translate - its part of our mission too.
>
> Now back to the point, Regional SugarLabs. I investigated the Ubuntu
> LoCoTeam "model" if there is such a thing. I found none, sorry to say,
> only a Howto describing very crude "how to run a team" and "what a
> team can do". It does not go into the relation to the mission a local
> group should have, the relationship it would have with SL central
> ("explicit connections outside" mantra). It also does not touch into
> the organizational principles or the strategies or goals of a
> relationship.
>
> The ubuntu LoCo team is explicitly compared to Linux user groups, that
> is, interest groups, fan clubs. That is what it is, basically, a fan
> club. Now I know sugar has fans, I'm one of them, but ubuntu has a
> large user base and great momentum, neither of which sugar has. In the
> spirit of the message being the medium, nobody is getting the message.
>
> Regional SugarLabs should be highly autonomous, carry their own
> identity and mission (which should significantly overlap or include
> central sugarlabs's mission). They should agree on similar set of
> values / principles and also joint set of goals. We just want to be
> "community centers", nodes in a network, not "Regional Offices".
> Basically this means recognition as local partners and ability to
> collect donations for our efforts. The reason for this perhaps is
> obvious: ¿How are we to expect peer recognition if our own structure
> is vertical?
>
> I'm thinking the problem is the underlying model of "aid" - developed
> countries helping developing countries. How are we hoping to bridge
> the divide with this mental model?
> I suggest a diffent approach, an education project aproach for
> de-centralized massive collaboration for learning communities.
> FuenteLibre leverages Sugar fot this and hopes to explore the realm of
> libre social networking (integrating Elgg with the schoolserver for
> instance). This way the medium is the message. For supporting this
> model I'll point you to some strategies in this book:
> http://www.kk.org/newrules/ "New Rules for the New Economy" by Kevin
> Kelly, in summary:
>
> 1) Embrace the Swarm.
> 2) Increasing Returns.
> 3) Plentitude, Not Scarcity.
> 4) Follow the Free.
> 5) Feed the Web First.
> 6) Let Go at the Top.
> 7) From Places to Spaces
> 8) No Harmony, All Flux.
> 9) Relationship Tech.
> 10) Opportunities Before Efficiencies.
>
> So paraphrasing NN, regional sugarlabs Are Educations Projects, not
> Software development projects. This is important, because as such, we
> will be more involved in deployment / integration / training.
> FuenteLibre, is currently involved in a potential deployment of 2300
> desktop computers with Sugar and Ubuntu, and will be offering a
> community learning workshop model for the regional education direction
> tech team that will be deploying and supporting these 200 computer
> labs.
>
> We would be more like a community managed education technology
> consultant non profit, community partner of sugarlabs and working
> closely in accordance to whatever we agree. One of FuenteLibre's goals
> is also to explore replicable / scalable governance model for learning
> communities, so we would encourage more local groups with diverse
> models / missions, and support and incubate them, provided they agree
> to the givene set of principles.
>
> This brings us to the principles, which I'm currently working on very
> heavily for FuenteLibre, for to quote Greg again, in large
> de-centralized projects, the values are the organization. One point
> here where FuenteLibre has a strong commitment is with free software
> and once our discourse and our legal personality (in the works) are in
> place, we will lauch a campaign for rejecting propietary software in
> education (this is also an example of why we shuold keep our own
> identity).
>
> I'll preparing the principles for FuenteLiber and our new site at
> http://beta.fuentelibre.org/
>
> Thanks for walking with me thru this, and thank you for your support
> of our efforts!
>
> I'll add my comments to the other stuff bellow.
>
> Sebastian
>
> 2008/11/28 Rafael Enrique Ortiz Guerrero <[hidden email]>:
>> For example here in Colombia,  OLPC/Sugar pilots are beginning to get
>> managed by Companies or Foundations, with needs for money but not with needs
>> for doing things well or loving what they are doing ;).
>
>
>
>>
>> Barely they are beginning to understand the project, but they are
>> truly advanced in relation to contracts.($$$).
>>
>> In addition to this, they are not even remotely interested in free software
>> communities...and in some way the liberties are getting compromised.
>
> In our economies, there is not much meritorcracy. Contracts are gained
> by influence. We grassroots geeks have no influence. You re our only
> point of refernce for influence and we expect your full support
> because we locally represent our shared principles that are being
> compromised by these incumbents.
>
>> So as David says there are two schemes, and people in countries can begin to
>> adjust to one or another.
> I'm very interested in this "company partner" scheme. Will be
> monitoring and figuring how to make it work here as well.
>
>>> > On Sat, Nov 29, 2008 at 1:13 PM, Yamandu Ploskonka
>>> > <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>> >
>>> >> One thing that we need to see is about giving legitimacy to volunteers
>>> >> in
>>> >> countries where only if you have an "official" piece of paper you are
>>> >> to be
>>> >> taken into account.  Right now I have an active, enthusiastic, capable
>>> >> volunteer in Uruguay who is not taken into account by higher
>>> >> authorities
>>> >> because he basically is "nobody".
>>> >>
> He must be my twin brother then! Please put us in touch.
>
> PS: I'd like to have my blog on planet too, tags OLPC and Sugar... Thanks!!
> --
> Sebastian Silva
> Iniciativa FuenteLibre
> http://blog.sebastiansilva.com/
>



--
Sebastian Silva
Iniciativa FuenteLibre
http://blog.sebastiansilva.com/
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Re: Sugar Labs introduction

David Farning-5
In reply to this post by Sebastian Silva-2
On Tue, Dec 2, 2008 at 4:17 PM, Sebastian Silva
<[hidden email]> wrote:
> Hello,
> I realize I should have jumped into this discussion earlier. Please
> excuse me, I've just put myself thru an intense matrixesque
> self-learning weeks around learning communities, communities of
> practice, community learning, critical pedagogy, radical pedagogy,
> network logics (economies, brains, forests, evolution, the internet),
> network economics, ecology, emergent control, beekeeping, and
> de-centralized governance... it's been fascinating.
> My research question has been "¿how to jumpstart an ecosystem?"

Pretty fascinating stuff.  My background is in economics so this stuff
is right up my alley:)

> The reason for my research is because I've been looking for a
> sustainability model for our FuenteLibre.Org grassroots initiative.
> I'll briefly relate our story: Born peruvian, raised in Chile,
> came to Lima where I have familiy a year ago to volunteer for OLPC.
> Got into suport-gang, eek,
> support for G1G1? So Walter comes, brings me an XO laptop, I meet
> Hernan Pachas from the ministry, and I offer to organize volunteers
> for support and training, etc. At the time, they had their hands full
> (and their heads), so they informed me they would not be working with
> volunteers, "they would handle it" and that "I should not worry about
> it".

"If you want it done right, you must do it yourself."  This mindset
still the biggest hurdle at OLPC and we are suffering from it at SL.
Slowly we are trying to build the trust back with the community.

> I understood immediately that for this project to succeed, it needed
> community involvement and transparency. I rallied for volunteers and
> got over 150 emails from educators, techies and all sorts of people
> accross Perú interested in helping out. I tailored a Xubuntu+Sugar
> LiveCD in spanish for download. Alas, as yama puts it, I was "nobody",
> so we were left out of helping out in the deployment and were pointed
> to "boring" (but important) stuff like translating the wiki. This was
> very frustrating and I will not make this mistake again. This is not
> to say we wont translate - its part of our mission too.

I apologize for that.  If you are still interested, we are very
interested in setting up a Local Lab in Peru.  Setting up a local labs
seems slightly less boring than translating:)

> Now back to the point, Regional SugarLabs. I investigated the Ubuntu
> LoCoTeam "model" if there is such a thing. I found none, sorry to say,
> only a Howto describing very crude "how to run a team" and "what a
> team can do". It does not go into the relation to the mission a local
> group should have, the relationship it would have with SL central
> ("explicit connections outside" mantra). It also does not touch into
> the organizational principles or the strategies or goals of a
> relationship.

Here I think we are having a miss communication.  LoCo teams are a
pretty good starting point for how to administratively set up and
monitor Local Labs from an upstream point of view.  I am, necessarily,
looking at the Sugar Labs/Local Labs relationship from the upstream
point of view.

There is nothing in the LoCo team documentation about how to run a
successful Local Lab.  Because, no one know how yet:)  It is still an
unsolved problem.  Hence, my approach to Local Labs is to make them as
autonomous as possible.   Over the next several months and years a set
of best pratices, adjusted for cultural differences, will develop.

> The ubuntu LoCo team is explicitly compared to Linux user groups, that
> is, interest groups, fan clubs. That is what it is, basically, a fan
> club. Now I know sugar has fans, I'm one of them, but ubuntu has a
> large user base and great momentum, neither of which sugar has. In the
> spirit of the message being the medium, nobody is getting the message.
>
> Regional SugarLabs should be highly autonomous, carry their own
> identity and mission (which should significantly overlap or include
> central sugarlabs's mission). They should agree on similar set of
> values / principles and also joint set of goals. We just want to be
> "community centers", nodes in a network, not "Regional Offices".
> Basically this means recognition as local partners and ability to
> collect donations for our efforts. The reason for this perhaps is
> obvious: ¿How are we to expect peer recognition if our own structure
> is vertical?

Yes, I agree and am pushing for autonomy!  My goal is for Local Labs
to become the key component of Sugar Labs.  Once we get the initial
Local Labs setup.  I am guessing that the Local Labs will have 10
times as many activate participants as the upstream Sugar Labs.

> I'm thinking the problem is the underlying model of "aid" - developed
> countries helping developing countries. How are we hoping to bridge
> the divide with this mental model?
> I suggest a diffent approach, an education project aproach for
> de-centralized massive collaboration for learning communities.
> FuenteLibre leverages Sugar fot this and hopes to explore the realm of
> libre social networking (integrating Elgg with the schoolserver for
> instance). This way the medium is the message. For supporting this
> model I'll point you to some strategies in this book:
> http://www.kk.org/newrules/ "New Rules for the New Economy" by Kevin
> Kelly, in summary:
>
> 1) Embrace the Swarm.
> 2) Increasing Returns.
> 3) Plentitude, Not Scarcity.
> 4) Follow the Free.
> 5) Feed the Web First.
> 6) Let Go at the Top.
> 7) From Places to Spaces
> 8) No Harmony, All Flux.
> 9) Relationship Tech.
> 10) Opportunities Before Efficiencies.
>
> So paraphrasing NN, regional sugarlabs Are Educations Projects, not
> Software development projects. This is important, because as such, we
> will be more involved in deployment / integration / training.
> FuenteLibre, is currently involved in a potential deployment of 2300
> desktop computers with Sugar and Ubuntu, and will be offering a
> community learning workshop model for the regional education direction
> tech team that will be deploying and supporting these 200 computer
> labs.
>
> We would be more like a community managed education technology
> consultant non profit, community partner of sugarlabs and working
> closely in accordance to whatever we agree. One of FuenteLibre's goals
> is also to explore replicable / scalable governance model for learning
> communities, so we would encourage more local groups with diverse
> models / missions, and support and incubate them, provided they agree
> to the givene set of principles.

Here we are back to the idea of autonomy:)  I don't care _how_ an
individual local lab is set up or run:)  Anyone is able to set up a
Local Lab however they want, as long as we agree on the basics of
mission, vision, and values.

> This brings us to the principles, which I'm currently working on very
> heavily for FuenteLibre, for to quote Greg again, in large
> de-centralized projects, the values are the organization. One point
> here where FuenteLibre has a strong commitment is with free software
> and once our discourse and our legal personality (in the works) are in
> place, we will lauch a campaign for rejecting propietary software in
> education (this is also an example of why we shuold keep our own
> identity).

Would you mind also documenting some of your thoughts on the Sugar Labs wiki?


> I'll preparing the principles for FuenteLiber and our new site at
> http://beta.fuentelibre.org/
>
> Thanks for walking with me thru this, and thank you for your support
> of our efforts!
>
> I'll add my comments to the other stuff bellow.
>
> Sebastian
>
> 2008/11/28 Rafael Enrique Ortiz Guerrero <[hidden email]>:
>> For example here in Colombia,  OLPC/Sugar pilots are beginning to get
>> managed by Companies or Foundations, with needs for money but not with needs
>> for doing things well or loving what they are doing ;).
>
>
>
>>
>> Barely they are beginning to understand the project, but they are
>> truly advanced in relation to contracts.($$$).
>>
>> In addition to this, they are not even remotely interested in free software
>> communities...and in some way the liberties are getting compromised.
>
> In our economies, there is not much meritorcracy. Contracts are gained
> by influence. We grassroots geeks have no influence. You re our only
> point of refernce for influence and we expect your full support
> because we locally represent our shared principles that are being
> compromised by these incumbents.

Please keep bugging us about this!

>> So as David says there are two schemes, and people in countries can begin to
>> adjust to one or another.
> I'm very interested in this "company partner" scheme. Will be
> monitoring and figuring how to make it work here as well.

thanks
david

>>> > On Sat, Nov 29, 2008 at 1:13 PM, Yamandu Ploskonka
>>> > <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>> >
>>> >> One thing that we need to see is about giving legitimacy to volunteers
>>> >> in
>>> >> countries where only if you have an "official" piece of paper you are
>>> >> to be
>>> >> taken into account.  Right now I have an active, enthusiastic, capable
>>> >> volunteer in Uruguay who is not taken into account by higher
>>> >> authorities
>>> >> because he basically is "nobody".
>>> >>
> He must be my twin brother then! Please put us in touch.
>
> PS: I'd like to have my blog on planet too, tags OLPC and Sugar... Thanks!!
> --
> Sebastian Silva
> Iniciativa FuenteLibre
> http://blog.sebastiansilva.com/
> _______________________________________________
> Sugar mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://lists.laptop.org/listinfo/sugar
>
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Re: Sugar Labs introduction

Yamandu Ploskonka

<snip>
David Farning wrote:

> On Tue, Dec 2, 2008 at 4:17 PM, Sebastian Silva
> <[hidden email]> wrote:
>  
>> My research question has been "¿how to jumpstart an ecosystem?"
>>    
>> Hernan Pachas from the ministry, and I offer to organize volunteers
>> for support and training, etc. At the time, they had their hands full
>> LiveCD in spanish for download. Alas, as yama puts it, I was "nobody",
>> so we were left out of helping out in the deployment and were pointed
>> to "boring" (but important) stuff like translating the wiki. This was
>> very frustrating and I will not make this mistake again. This is not
>> to say we wont translate - its part of our mission too.
>>    

Standard procedure seems to be everywhere point volunteers to work no
one wants (like cleaning up the mess, etc)

lesson for us:  See volunteers differently, point them to "fun stuff".

In successful volunteer-dependent organizations (I've been with Scouting
and YMCA for several generations), you choose your volunteer coordinator
as carefully as you choose your CEO, and pay him better than pretty much
anyone else - often he is the only one who actually gets paid...

>> Now back to the point, Regional SugarLabs. I investigated the Ubuntu
>> LoCoTeam "model" if there is such a thing. I found none, sorry to say,
>> only a Howto describing very crude "how to run a team" and "what a
>> team can do". It does not go into the relation to the mission a local
>>    
> There is nothing in the LoCo team documentation about how to run a
> successful Local Lab.  Because, no one know how yet:)  It is still an
> unsolved problem.  Hence, my approach to Local Labs is to make them as
> autonomous as possible.   Over the next several months and years a set
> of best pratices, adjusted for cultural differences, will develop.
>  

Yama calls community building  an "art", precisely because it doesn't
seem to fit into "how-to" manual models.  Maybe people who get
communities running don't read manuals, don't write manuals?  different
skill sets?  Or maybe it is a good thing, that because communities are
organic things they can be dealt with only by organic things, not by
something inherently dead, as a manual?

Best-practices list is a good start.  I'll check with my pals at YMCA,
ACA, Scouts

>> Regional SugarLabs should be highly autonomous, carry their own
>> identity and mission (which should significantly overlap or include
>> central sugarlabs's mission). They should agree on similar set of
>> values / principles and also joint set of goals. We just want to be
>> "community centers", nodes in a network, not "Regional Offices".
>> Basically this means recognition as local partners and ability to
>> collect donations for our efforts. The reason for this perhaps is
>> obvious: ¿How are we to expect peer recognition if our own structure
>> is vertical?
>>    
>
> Yes, I agree and am pushing for autonomy!  My goal is for Local Labs
> to become the key component of Sugar Labs.  Once we get the initial
> Local Labs setup.  I am guessing that the Local Labs will have 10
> times as many activate participants as the upstream Sugar Labs.
>  
+1

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Re: Sugar Labs introduction

David Farning-5
On Wed, Dec 3, 2008 at 1:34 PM, Yamandu Ploskonka <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> <snip>
> David Farning wrote:
>>
>> On Tue, Dec 2, 2008 at 4:17 PM, Sebastian Silva
>> <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> My research question has been "¿how to jumpstart an ecosystem?"
>>>    Hernan Pachas from the ministry, and I offer to organize volunteers
>>> for support and training, etc. At the time, they had their hands full
>>> LiveCD in spanish for download. Alas, as yama puts it, I was "nobody",
>>> so we were left out of helping out in the deployment and were pointed
>>> to "boring" (but important) stuff like translating the wiki. This was
>>> very frustrating and I will not make this mistake again. This is not
>>> to say we wont translate - its part of our mission too.
>>>
>
> Standard procedure seems to be everywhere point volunteers to work no one
> wants (like cleaning up the mess, etc)
>
> lesson for us:  See volunteers differently, point them to "fun stuff".
>
> In successful volunteer-dependent organizations (I've been with Scouting and
> YMCA for several generations), you choose your volunteer coordinator as
> carefully as you choose your CEO, and pay him better than pretty much anyone
> else - often he is the only one who actually gets paid...

Hmmm. Maybe this is why we asked Yama to take a leadership role in
establishing Local Labs:)  I am pretty good at organization stuff.
But, I realize that I suck at group community stuff.  So, if you find
anyone interested in being the face of the community, please let me
know!

david

>>> Now back to the point, Regional SugarLabs. I investigated the Ubuntu
>>> LoCoTeam "model" if there is such a thing. I found none, sorry to say,
>>> only a Howto describing very crude "how to run a team" and "what a
>>> team can do". It does not go into the relation to the mission a local
>>>
>>
>> There is nothing in the LoCo team documentation about how to run a
>> successful Local Lab.  Because, no one know how yet:)  It is still an
>> unsolved problem.  Hence, my approach to Local Labs is to make them as
>> autonomous as possible.   Over the next several months and years a set
>> of best pratices, adjusted for cultural differences, will develop.
>>
>
> Yama calls community building  an "art", precisely because it doesn't seem
> to fit into "how-to" manual models.  Maybe people who get communities
> running don't read manuals, don't write manuals?  different skill sets?  Or
> maybe it is a good thing, that because communities are organic things they
> can be dealt with only by organic things, not by something inherently dead,
> as a manual?
>
> Best-practices list is a good start.  I'll check with my pals at YMCA, ACA,
> Scouts
>
>>> Regional SugarLabs should be highly autonomous, carry their own
>>> identity and mission (which should significantly overlap or include
>>> central sugarlabs's mission). They should agree on similar set of
>>> values / principles and also joint set of goals. We just want to be
>>> "community centers", nodes in a network, not "Regional Offices".
>>> Basically this means recognition as local partners and ability to
>>> collect donations for our efforts. The reason for this perhaps is
>>> obvious: ¿How are we to expect peer recognition if our own structure
>>> is vertical?
>>>
>>
>> Yes, I agree and am pushing for autonomy!  My goal is for Local Labs
>> to become the key component of Sugar Labs.  Once we get the initial
>> Local Labs setup.  I am guessing that the Local Labs will have 10
>> times as many activate participants as the upstream Sugar Labs.
>>
>
> +1
>
>
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Re: Sugar Labs introduction

Edward Cherlin
In reply to this post by Yamandu Ploskonka
>> On Sat, Nov 29, 2008 at 1:13 PM, Yamandu Ploskonka <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>>> One thing that we need to see is about giving legitimacy to volunteers in
>>> countries where only if you have an "official" piece of paper you are to be
>>> taken into account.  Right now I have an active, enthusiastic, capable
>>> volunteer in Uruguay who is not taken into account by higher authorities
>>> because he basically is "nobody".

It is not necessary to be official to do good work. I am helping two
students at Olin College of Engineering to organize a newsletter
around two topics: What is really going on at OLPC? (the hard
question) and How can I join in? (where I have a number of ideas to
share, and others have many more). We know that we can use any set of
skills and knowledge to do something that the children need, since
they need to know about absolutely everything. So we can get anybody
started on real work, connect them with the community, and so on.

Those who want to become "official" within their country in order to
work with other official groups should contact Earth Treasury (me) and
Open Learning Exchange at http://ole.org/. We can work out a plan for
a group of volunteers to do anything useful as part of a larger
project to get XOs into schools, create teacher training materials and
textbooks in local languages, and so on.

>>> A Sugarlabs "credential" or some sort of accreditation?

That, too.

>>> Yama


--
Silent Thunder (默雷/धर्ममेघशब्दगर्ज/دھرممیگھشبدگر ج) is my name
And Children are my nation.
The Cosmos is my dwelling place, The Truth my destination.
http://wiki.sugarlabs.org/go/User:Mokurai
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Re: Sugar Labs introduction

Sebastian Silva-2
In reply to this post by Yamandu Ploskonka
>> Over the next several months and years a set
>> of best pratices, adjusted for cultural differences, will develop.
>Yama calls community building  an "art", precisely because it doesn't seem
> to fit into "how-to" manual models.  Maybe people who get communities
> running don't read manuals, don't write manuals?  different skill sets?  Or
> maybe it is a good thing, that because communities are organic things they
> can be dealt with only by organic things, not by something inherently dead,
> as a manual?

I must agree "art" is more than "best practices". Still there are
several kinds of voluntary organizations, take Debian for instance. It
has a Constitution and a Social Contract (our equivalent: Governance
and Principles).

So we should now agree on Principles and Goals.
Those are pretty clear in http://sugarlabs.org/go/Sugar_Labs

Look under Identity.
Clear mission: is pretty clear.
Affinities and aversions: For instance, i believe we should take a
position of at the very least ethically recommending against
propietary software and rejecting Windows on the XO. In a way Walter
already does this in person. ;-)
Our position regarding OLPC's goals and mission should also be clear
(why sugarlabs exists - the very name of this mailing list "its an
education project").
So our educational position (affinties / aversions) should also appear
here (constructivist learning, self learning, community learning,
critical thinking).
Explicit connections outside: I guess we're working them out now...
Perhaps some day we'll have an API for this ;-)

--
Sebastian Silva
Iniciativa FuenteLibre
http://blog.sebastiansilva.com/
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Re: Sugar Labs introduction

Sebastian Silva-2
(...)
>  a Constitution and a Social Contract (our equivalent: Governance
> and Principles).
>
> So we should now agree on Principles and Goals.
> Those are pretty clear in http://sugarlabs.org/go/Sugar_Labs
>  
In this spirit I'd like to propose to move most of [[Sugar_Labs]] to
[[Principles]] or even [[Social Contract]].

It would contain:
 * Principles + Values (Educational first, +community/social,
+technological)
 * Goals
 * Strongly suggested: Strategies (this part could vary quite a bit for
local labs for instance - its the part we discuss open organizations and
decentralized governance - it should also be where we set some conduct
guidelines or even point to a code of conduct, like ubuntu does).


I would also suggest this document should be ratified by the oversight
board each time it is modified, since it is as important (or even more!
than the governance document).

I'm writing precisely such documents for FuenteLibre and my model is
pretty much the same. I'll share in a bit, must finish it.

Sebastian
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